Ask me anything

A point of transition, or when lined up, many points, creating a line, a curve, a crossing, a passage.

I wrote the monthly column "On the Trail of Mary Jane" for McSweeney's Internet Tendency from 2013-2014. I have essays, poetry, fiction, and interviews in The New York Times, The Nervous Breakdown, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Rumpus, PANK, The Coachella Review, The Collapsar, Specter Magazine, WhiskeyPaper, and more. My first book, EXCAVATION: A MEMOIR was released in July 2014 (http://bit.ly/1BcJteA).  HOLLYWOOD NOTEBOOK is slated for release from Writ Large Press in spring 2015. You can also visit me somewhat more statically at www.wendyortiz.com.
Stowaways in Lena Dunham's suitcase

I’d be pretty stoked with this kind of haul from a bookstore. What great company to be in!

9 hours ago
3 notes
3,784 plays

Wishful karaoke thinking. Also, a good song for fall.

(Source: thomasdavenport, via badgerlips)

4 days ago
1,209 notes
My contributor’s copy arrived today! Isn’t it handsome?

My contributor’s copy arrived today! Isn’t it handsome?

5 days ago
2 notes
Unearthing the Fossils of Shame | The Los Angeles Review of Books

Thanks to Amy Silverberg & the Los Angeles Review of Books for this review.

2 weeks ago
2 notes
Review of Excavation: A Memoir @ Hippocampus Magazine

Thanks to Amber Peckham and Hippocampus Magazine for the review. 

"Wendy Ortiz’s memoir Excavation (Future Tense Books, July 2014) is titled after a process not just of digging, but of exposing, laying bare artifacts in a way that allows researchers to study and learn from them. This is the exact task she is about as well, working the fingers of her direct, artful prose into one of the most painful periods of her past in an attempt to understand how it has shaped and impacted her present self. This may be the aim of all memoir, but Ortiz’s story and use of craft are both compelling enough to set her work apart.”

2 weeks ago
3 notes
Tomorrow night I read in a mash-up of two of my favorite spots: 1) a library in 2) Chicago.

Tomorrow night I read in a mash-up of two of my favorite spots: 1) a library in 2) Chicago.

3 weeks ago
1 note
inutiliatruncatus:

Kris Kuksi, Barasingha. (2010)

inutiliatruncatus:

Kris Kuksi, Barasingha. (2010)

(Source: kuksi.com, via bright-sun-shine)

3 weeks ago
63 notes
Let's Just Do This: Eleven Small-Press Authors and their Publishing Partners | Poets and Writers

In which Poets & Writers magazine asks small press authors & publishers why we chose each other. Excited to be included. 

3 days ago
2 notes
One week from tonight:
The Rumpus presents A SCREAM WITHOUT A MOUTH: STORIES OF REACHING OUT at LitCrawl LA: NoHo!
The Rumpus will join forces with The Rattling Wall and PEN Center USA’s Michelle Meyering to bring you “A Scream Without a Mouth: Stories of Reaching Out” with an intriguing lineup of 7 wild writers who we feel embody the spirit of the Hubert Selby Junior quote in our title. As writers, we dig into the abyss for our darkest tales in order to hold them up to the light and show you their inherent, convulsive beauty. We feel that both magazines extend their reach specifically to highlight those writers who fearlessly grasp that hand of terror, delight and humor on the page.


The NoHo Arts Center
11136 Magnolia Blvd.
North Hollywood, CA 91601

8:00PM-8:45PM



Featured Writers:

Wendy C. Ortiz:

Wendy C. Ortiz is the author of Excavation: A Memoir (Future Tense Books), of which Emily Rapp says, “Readers will find everything here: a gripping and necessary story, luminous writing and an utterly compelling heroine who is both generous and fierce.” Her second book, Hollywood Notebook, is forthcoming from Writ Large Press in spring 2015. Wendy wrote a year-long, monthly column for McSweeney’s Internet Tendency about medical marijuana culture in Southern California. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Nervous Breakdown, The Rumpus, and many other journals. Visit her at www.wendyortiz.com orwendycortiz.tumblr.com.

Antonia Crane: 

Antonia Crane is a writer, professor and Moth Story Slam Winner in Los Angeles. She is the author of the memoir Spent (Barnacle Books/Rare Bird Lit,March, 2014). Her other work can be found in Playboy, Cosmopolitan Magazine, The Rumpus, Dame Magazine, Salon, PANK magazine, Black Clock, The Weeklings, The Believer, Frequencies, Slake, The Los Angeles Review, The New Black, and lots of other anthologies. She is the Non fiction editor of Word Riot. She scales Griffith Park mountain and rides her bike. Find her here: http://antoniacrane.com/. She tweets @ #antoniacrane.

Douglas Kearney:

Douglas Kearney is a Los Angeles-based Poet, performer, and librettist who grew up in Altadena, California. His lyrical poems range across the page, bridging thematic concerns such as politics, African-American culture, masks, the Trickster figure, and contemporary music. He describes the nontraditional layout of his poems as “performative typography.” Kearney’s full-lenght poetry collections include Fear, Some (2006), The Black Automaton (2009), which was chosen by Catherine Wagner for the National Poetry Series, and Patter (2014). He teaches at CalArts.

Jim Ruland:

Jim Ruland is a veteran of the U.S. Navy, author of the novel Forest of Fortune (Aug. 2014) and the short story collection Big Lonesome, and co-author of Giving the Finger (with Scott Campbell, Jr. of Discovery Channel’s Deadliest Catch). He runs the Southern California-based reading series Vermin on the Mount, now in its tenth year.

Corrie Greathouse:

Corrie Greathouse is the author of the novella Another Name For Autumn (Black Hill Press, 2013), Saturday editor of The Rumpus, founding member of the Hollywood Institute of Poetics, and an Oxford comma devotee. Her work has been published in The Toronto Quarterly, Falling Star Magazine, ism’s Still Developing: A Story of Instant Gratification, and others. Her next Black Hill Press novella will be released in November, 2014. You can find her on twitter @cgreathouse.

Kyle Sawyer:

Once upon a time, Kyle was known as fee-male, not too long ago Kyle was known as male. Today, Kyle spends time confusing folks of all generations. A theory-head and creative writer, Kyle uses all avenues possible to challenge the web of power, including the power and privilege gained by moving through the world perceived as a white cis-male. Kyle is also the program coordinator for LAMBDA Literary Foundation in Los Angeles. 

Jerry Stahl: 

Jerry Stahl is the author of nine books, including Permanent Midnight, I, Fatty and, most recently, Happy Mutant Baby Pills and Bad Sex on Speed. His writing has appeared in Esquire, The New York Times and The Believer, among other places. His latest film and TV work includes the HBO film, Hemingway & Gellhorn and the IFC series Maron. 

With host Michelle Meyering, who is the Director of Programs and Events at PEN Center USA and founding editor of The Rattling Wall, a literary journal. Michelle has produced over 200 literary events across Southern California and in January was named a 2013 “Face To Watch” by the Los Angeles Times. She currently teaches in the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program in Los Angeles. Michelle will be giving away FREE back issues of The Rattling Wall to guests!

One week from tonight:

The Rumpus presents A SCREAM WITHOUT A MOUTH: STORIES OF REACHING OUT at LitCrawl LA: NoHo!

The Rumpus will join forces with The Rattling Wall and PEN Center USA’s Michelle Meyering to bring you “A Scream Without a Mouth: Stories of Reaching Out” with an intriguing lineup of 7 wild writers who we feel embody the spirit of the Hubert Selby Junior quote in our title. As writers, we dig into the abyss for our darkest tales in order to hold them up to the light and show you their inherent, convulsive beauty. We feel that both magazines extend their reach specifically to highlight those writers who fearlessly grasp that hand of terror, delight and humor on the page.
The NoHo Arts Center
11136 Magnolia Blvd.
North Hollywood, CA 91601
8:00PM-8:45PM
Featured Writers:
Wendy C. Ortiz:
Wendy C. Ortiz is the author of Excavation: A Memoir (Future Tense Books), of which Emily Rapp says, “Readers will find everything here: a gripping and necessary story, luminous writing and an utterly compelling heroine who is both generous and fierce.” Her second book, Hollywood Notebook, is forthcoming from Writ Large Press in spring 2015. Wendy wrote a year-long, monthly column for McSweeney’s Internet Tendency about medical marijuana culture in Southern California. Her work has appeared in the New York Times, Vol. 1 Brooklyn, The Nervous Breakdown, The Rumpus, and many other journals. Visit her at www.wendyortiz.com orwendycortiz.tumblr.com.
Antonia Crane: 
Antonia Crane is a writer, professor and Moth Story Slam Winner in Los Angeles. She is the author of the memoir Spent (Barnacle Books/Rare Bird Lit,March, 2014). Her other work can be found in Playboy, Cosmopolitan Magazine, The Rumpus, Dame Magazine, Salon, PANK magazine, Black Clock, The Weeklings, The Believer, Frequencies, Slake, The Los Angeles Review, The New Black, and lots of other anthologies. She is the Non fiction editor of Word Riot. She scales Griffith Park mountain and rides her bike. Find her here: http://antoniacrane.com/. She tweets @ #antoniacrane.
Douglas Kearney:
Douglas Kearney is a Los Angeles-based Poet, performer, and librettist who grew up in Altadena, California. His lyrical poems range across the page, bridging thematic concerns such as politics, African-American culture, masks, the Trickster figure, and contemporary music. He describes the nontraditional layout of his poems as “performative typography.” Kearney’s full-lenght poetry collections include Fear, Some (2006), The Black Automaton (2009), which was chosen by Catherine Wagner for the National Poetry Series, and Patter (2014). He teaches at CalArts.
Jim Ruland:
Jim Ruland is a veteran of the U.S. Navy, author of the novel Forest of Fortune (Aug. 2014) and the short story collection Big Lonesome, and co-author of Giving the Finger (with Scott Campbell, Jr. of Discovery Channel’s Deadliest Catch). He runs the Southern California-based reading series Vermin on the Mount, now in its tenth year.
Corrie Greathouse:
Corrie Greathouse is the author of the novella Another Name For Autumn (Black Hill Press, 2013), Saturday editor of The Rumpus, founding member of the Hollywood Institute of Poetics, and an Oxford comma devotee. Her work has been published in The Toronto Quarterly, Falling Star Magazine, ism’s Still Developing: A Story of Instant Gratification, and others. Her next Black Hill Press novella will be released in November, 2014. You can find her on twitter @cgreathouse.
Kyle Sawyer:
Once upon a time, Kyle was known as fee-male, not too long ago Kyle was known as male. Today, Kyle spends time confusing folks of all generations. A theory-head and creative writer, Kyle uses all avenues possible to challenge the web of power, including the power and privilege gained by moving through the world perceived as a white cis-male. Kyle is also the program coordinator for LAMBDA Literary Foundation in Los Angeles. 
Jerry Stahl: 
Jerry Stahl is the author of nine books, including Permanent Midnight, I, Fatty and, most recently, Happy Mutant Baby Pills and Bad Sex on Speed. His writing has appeared in Esquire, The New York Times and The Believer, among other places. His latest film and TV work includes the HBO film, Hemingway & Gellhorn and the IFC series Maron. 
With host Michelle Meyering, who is the Director of Programs and Events at PEN Center USA and founding editor of The Rattling Wall, a literary journal. Michelle has produced over 200 literary events across Southern California and in January was named a 2013 “Face To Watch” by the Los Angeles Times. She currently teaches in the UCLA Extension Writers’ Program in Los Angeles. Michelle will be giving away FREE back issues of The Rattling Wall to guests!
4 days ago
7 notes
Episode 64: Excavation – Literary Disco

Listening to Tod Goldberg, Julia Pistell, & Rider Strong talk about Excavation on Literary Disco. The book made them uncomfortable, but maybe not as uncomfortable as I feel listening to 3 smart people talk about my book on a podcast. Spoiler: they say some awesome things & stuff like, “This should be required reading for young high school girls” & “I feel like I lived my teenage years with this girl!” (Double spoiler: Two are Valley boys of my generation.) Julia also really liked one of the hardest chapters for me to write & Tod read from one of the chapters I’ve been reading in public lately. 

1 week ago
8 notes
heaveninawildflower:

Pomegranate Tree. Plate from ‘Flore Medicale’ decrite par MM. Chaumeton, Poiret, Chamberet ; peinte par Mme E. P. … et par M. J. Turpin. (1828).
archive.org

heaveninawildflower:

Pomegranate Tree. Plate from ‘Flore Medicale’ decrite par MM. Chaumeton, Poiret, Chamberet ; peinte par Mme E. P. … et par M. J. Turpin. (1828).

archive.org

2 weeks ago
47 notes
            I drive the streets of Los Angeles in the car whose maker named it the “Pathfinder.”
            This vehicle has traversed thousands of miles, sometimes outlasting newer cars; its bill of health was always proclaimed as “good” when I take it to the shop for routine maintenance.

            The name of this car is never lost on me. I bought it a time when I was trying to make my own path with no maps, and all I needed, really, was a dependable something. When I came across it, black and shining in the sun, it was the first time I felt the affection people profess to feel for their cars. It was big, big enough to live in, and for some reason, this thought comforted me.
RIP this beautiful beast I’ve loved for 9 years, that drove me to the desert and back countless times, that is now deemed “a total loss” after being stolen then involved in an accident while out of my possession.
The above in italics was, yes, an actual beginning of an old essay in which I wanted to consider what this car propelled me toward since I’ve owned it, and how its name resonated with me. 
I may never have another love affair with a car again—it’s not my way—but this one? This was a good one. 

            I drive the streets of Los Angeles in the car whose maker named it the “Pathfinder.”

            This vehicle has traversed thousands of miles, sometimes outlasting newer cars; its bill of health was always proclaimed as “good” when I take it to the shop for routine maintenance.

            The name of this car is never lost on me. I bought it a time when I was trying to make my own path with no maps, and all I needed, really, was a dependable something. When I came across it, black and shining in the sun, it was the first time I felt the affection people profess to feel for their cars. It was big, big enough to live in, and for some reason, this thought comforted me.

RIP this beautiful beast I’ve loved for 9 years, that drove me to the desert and back countless times, that is now deemed “a total loss” after being stolen then involved in an accident while out of my possession.

The above in italics was, yes, an actual beginning of an old essay in which I wanted to consider what this car propelled me toward since I’ve owned it, and how its name resonated with me. 

I may never have another love affair with a car again—it’s not my way—but this one? This was a good one. 

2 weeks ago
3 notes
nemfrog:

Fig. 45. Phases of Venus. Les merveilles célestes. 1881.

nemfrog:

Fig. 45. Phases of Venus. Les merveilles célestes. 1881.

(via scientificillustration)

3 weeks ago
823 notes